PLEA

Know Your Rights

PLEA is committed to delivering services to children, youth, adults and families that meet their individual strengths, needs, goals and circumstances. It’s important to us that participants are treated with dignity and respect, and that their rights are protected.

These are their rights while they are receiving services from us. They are explained to each participant at intake, both verbally and through the written materials they receive, and are constantly reinforced throughout their time with us. Everyone who is connected to PLEA is expected to uphold these rights.

Participants have the right o be provided with timely and accurate information about the nature and limitations of the services available to them, including their rights and obligations while accessing these services.

Participants have the right to consent or refuse service delivery, release of information, concurrent services, composition of the service delivery team or involvement in research projects.  This right may be limited by legal or other considerations. 

Participants have the right to participate in case conferences that concerns them and to have decisions that affect their daily life explained to them.

Participants have the right to be consulted and to express their views about important decisions that affect them.  This includes their own written plan that will be followed while they are receiving services from PLEA.

Participants have the right to receive services in an environment that is safe, supportive and respectful of their race, colour, ancestry, place of origin, political belief, religion, marital status, family status, physical and mental abilities, gender, sexual orientation or gender identity.

Participants have the right to an interpreter if language or disability is a barrier to them being involved in decisions affecting their care or participation in our services.

Participants have the right to privacy and confidentiality and to have their personal information protected against unauthorized access and disclosure.

Participants have the right to read PLEA’s case records about themselves, ask for corrections and insert their own written statement.

Participants have the right to be treated with dignity and respect.  All forms of physical punishment, financial and other forms of exploitation, seclusion, restraint, abuse, neglect, retaliation, humiliating or abusive language, and demeaning behaviour are strictly prohibited at PLEA.

Participants have the right to receive services from us that are free from all forms of harassment, discrimination, intimidation and bullying.

Participants have the right to know their legal rights.

Participants have the right to receive a written receipt for any item or property taken from them.

Participants have the right to have private conversations with a lawyer, the Representative for Children and Youth, the Ombudsman, a member of the BC Legislative Assembly or a Member of Parliament.

Participants have the right to be informed about the Representative for Children and Youth and to have someone help them to get in touch with him/her.

Participants have the right to be told about PLEA’s complaints policies and how to make a complaint.

Participants have the right to be informed about self-help and advocacy support services.

Participants have the right to speak to the PLEA Manager in charge of the services they are receiving.  They also have the right to speak to the Program Director or the Executive Director of PLEA.

Participants have the right to know that, any research in which they may be directly involved, will adhere to research guidelines and ethics.

If a participant is living in a PLEA Family Caregiver Home they also have the following rights:

Participants have the right to live in a safe, healthy and caring home environment.  They have the right to be provided with the same quality of care that other members of the family household receive.

Participants have the right to receive a written description of their Family Caregiver’s expectations of their behaviour, any house guidelines that apply to them while they are in their care and the consequences if they do not meet these requirements.

Participants have the right to reasonable privacy and to have their own personal belongings.  They also have the right to have a safe place to keep their possessions.  This right is subject to criminal law, which means that they cannot have items that could harm themselves or someone else, such as drugs or weapons.  They cannot receive or keep anything that is illegal, such as stolen property.

Participants have the right to send and receive mail unopened and uncensored.  This right is subject to any limitations imposed by a court order or their service plan.

Participants have the right to speak privately with members of their family.  This right is subject to any limitations imposed by a court order or their service plan.

Participants have the right to have visitors following approval and planning with their Family Caregiver.  This right is subject to any limitations imposed by a court order or their service plan.

Participants have the right to receive medical care when they need it.

Participants have the right to participate in social and recreational activities if they are available and accessible in the community, and suited to their interests and abilities.

Participants have the right to receive religious instruction and to participate in the religious or spiritual activities of their choosing.  They also have the right to choose not to participate in religious instructions or activities.

Participants have the right to receive guidance and encouragement to maintain their cultural heritage.

If you feel a participant’s rights are not being respected or if they want to talk about their rights, please contact their PLEA worker, the Program Manager or Program Director.