PLEA
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Strategic Plan August 2023

August 2023

A Message from CEO, Tim Veresh

Our 2022-27 Strategic Plan was published at our 2022 Annual General Meeting. The theme is ‘Going from Good to Great’, which reflects our desire to build on our strong foundations to grow our reach, enhance our programs and services, and cement our position as a leading social services agency in Western Canada. Here is an overview of our progress made against each of the Plan’s six pillars of change:

Our 2022-27 Strategic Plan was published at our 2022 Annual General Meeting. The theme is ‘Going from Good to Great’, which reflects our desire to build on our strong foundations to grow our reach, enhance our programs and services, and cement our position as a leading social services agency in Western Canada. Here is an overview of our progress made against each of the Plan’s six pillars of change:

1.Structure for Leadership

AIM: In five years, we will have an organizational structure that is easy to understand, written succession plans for key roles, and a Board focused on governance over operations.  

THIS YEAR: We created a three-year Board succession strategy, established the Executive Leadership Team, agreed on a new organizational structure, and began to transition to this new structure. We also developed new job descriptions for the Executive Leadership Team and the director positions within this new structure.  

2. Collaborative Excellence

AIM: In five years, teams will work as well with one another as they do today within one another; shared systems, approaches, and initiatives will be the norm and an enterprise (agency-wide) mindset will thrive. 

THIS YEAR: Our Indigenous Matters and Culture, Diversity & Accessibility committees aligned their strategic plans with the agency’s. We also began planning an All-Staff event on the topic of Collaborative Excellence to give our employees the chance to build connections with one another, get to know programs outside of their own, and reflect on the skills required for effective collaboration.  

3. Sustainable Stewardship

AIM: In five years, strong, sustainable funding models will support all aspects of program delivery, and PLEA’s infrastructure will be fully leveraged to promote program sustainability.  

THIS YEAR: A strategy to find caregivers for the youth and adults we serve was approved; its initial rollout commenced in September 2022. An IT strategy (which includes a projected schedule for the creation of reserve funds and a depreciation schedule) was also devised, as was a report outlining the merits and impact of creating a PLEA foundation. The Board subsequently decided not to establish a foundation at this time. $300,000 was transferred to the KidStart Legacy Fund, and a further $150,000 was transferred to the Children of the Street Legacy Fund. The funds stand at $723,320 and $462,225 as at the end of the fiscal year.

4. Innovative Housing 

AIM: In five years, we’ll have access to appropriate homes for any participant who needs one.  

THIS YEAR: PLEA was successful in a proposal to provide two new specialized youth homes; one in Burnaby and one in North Fraser. The intention behind these homes is to provide a safe, loving, and nurturing environment for children and youth whose needs can’t be met through the level of supervision and intervention provided in less intensive settings (i.e., foster care and family care).

5. Outcome Measurement 

AIM: In five years, we’ll measure ourselves against outcomes as well as outputs, thereby clearly demonstrating the value of what we do.  

THIS YEAR: PLEA partnered with McCreary Centre Society to complete literature reviews for three of its program areas (mentoring, youth justice and specialized homes for youth). A fourth, (on sexual exploitation intervention services) was made available through our partnership with our friends at Covenant House Vancouver. A review of our mentoring program (aka KidStart) highlighted that it is well aligned with best practice. Furthermore, the program has implemented surveys that measure its service against the outcomes identified in its review.

6. Ally in Reconciliation 

AIM: In five years, we’ll be well known as a culturally safe place for all and recognized for our allyship with Indigenous communities.  

THIS YEAR: PLEA partnered with local Indigenous communities to host events celebrating and commemorating Indigenous knowledge, culture and history including a Wake-Up Canoe (Brushing) ceremony, two National Indigenous Peoples Day events and an event on National Day for Truth & Reconciliation, aka Orange Shirt Day. To support creation of a culturally safe workplace, PLEA hosted Kathi Camilleri for her “Building Bridges Through Understanding the Village” workshop to provide 4 training sessions over 2 days for around 100 PLEA staff. We also hosted Dr. Dustin Louie for a 2-part training series open to all PLEA staff, caregivers, volunteers and external stakeholders and agencies. Two frontline staff, one Manager and PLEA’s Indigenous Knowledge Keeper completed The Federation of Community Social Services of BC’s Transformative Reconciliation training, taking the number of staff who have undertaken this training to six in total. And finally, PLEA’s Chief Executive Officer and Indigenous Knowledge Keeper visited the Kwikwetlem First Nation to gift one of the murals commissioned by Indigenous Artist Rosalie Dipscu-Williams for our Port Coquitlam location. This was accompanied by a letter affirming PLEA’s role as the stewards of the artwork and confirming PLEA would gift the rest of the artwork to the Nation if ever it no longer has use for it. 

Sincerely,

Tim Veresh

Chief Executive Officer

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